Monthly Archives: October 2011

The 5 Most Critical Statistical Concepts

It seems like everywhere we look, data is being generated - from politics, to biology, to publishing, to social networks. There are also diverse new computational tools, like GPGPU and cloud computing, that expand the statistical toolbox. Statistical theory is … Continue reading

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Computing on the Language

And now for something a bit more esoteric…. I recently wrote a function to deal with a strange problem. Writing the function ended up being a fun challenge related to computing on the R language itself. Here’s the problem: Write … Continue reading

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Visualizing Yahoo Email

Here is a cool page where yahoo shows you the email it is processing in real time. It includes a visualization of the most popular words in emails at a given time. A pretty neat tool and definitely good for … Continue reading

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Web-scraping

The internet is the greatest source of publicly available data. One of the key skills to being able to obtain data from the web is “web-scraping”, where you use a piece of software to run through a website and collect … Continue reading

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Archetypal Athletes

Here is a cool paper on the ArXiv about archetypal athletes. The basic idea is to look at a large number of variables for each player and identify multivariate outliers or extremes. These outliers are the archetypes talked about in … Continue reading

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Graduate student data analysis inspired by a high-school teacher

I love watching TED talks. One of my absolute favorites is the talk by Dan Meyer on how math class needs a makeover. Dan also has one of the more fascinating blogs I have read. He talks about math education, primarily K-12 education. … Continue reading

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The self-assessment trap

Several months ago I was sitting next to my colleague Ben Langmead at the Genome Informatics meeting. Various talks were presented on short read alignments and every single performance table showed the speaker’s method as #1 and Ben’s Bowtie as … Continue reading

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Interview With Chris Barr

Chris Barr Chris Barr is an assistant professor of biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. He moved to Boston after getting his Ph.D. at UCLA and then doing a postdoc at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of … Continue reading

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Anthropology of the Tribe of Statisticians

From the BBC a pretty fascinating radio piece. …in the same way that a telescope enables you to see things that are too far away to see with the naked eye, a microscope enables you to see things that are … Continue reading

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Finding good collaborators

The job of the statistician is almost entirely about collaboration. Sure, there’s theoretical work that we can do by ourselves, but most of the impact that we have on science comes from our work with scientists in other fields. Collaboration … Continue reading

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