Monthly Archives: January 2012

This graph makes me think Kobe is not that good, he just shoots a lot

I find it surprising that NBA commentators rarely talk about field goal percentage. Everybody knows that the more you shoot the more you score. But players that score a lot are admired without consideration of their FG%. Of course having … Continue reading

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Why in-person education isn't dead yet...but a statistician could finish it off

A growing tend in education is to put lectures online, for free. The Kahn Academy, Stanford’s recent AI course, and Gary King’s new quantitative government course at Harvard are three of the more prominent examples. This new pedagogical format is … Continue reading

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Sunday data/statistics link roundup (1/29)

A really nice D3 tutorial. I’m 100% on board with D3, if they could figure out a way to export the graphics as pdfs, I think this would be the best visualization tool out there.  A personalized calculator that tells … Continue reading

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This simple bar graph clearly demonstrates that the US can easily increase research funding

Some NIH R01 paylines are down to 10%. This means only 10% of grants are being funded. The plot below highlights that all we need is a tiny litte slice from Defense, Medicare, Medicaid or Social Security to bring that … Continue reading

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When should statistics papers be published in Science and Nature?

Like many statisticians, I was amped to see a statistics paper appear in Science. Given the impact that statistics has on the scientific community, it is a shame that more statistics papers don’t appear in the glossy journals like Science … Continue reading

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The end of in-class lectures is closer than I thought

Our previous post on future of (statistics) graduate education was motivated by  he Stanford online course on Artificial Intelligence.  Here is an update on the class that had 160,000 people enroll. Some highlights: 1- Sebastian Thrun has given up his tenure at Stanford and … Continue reading

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A wordcloud comparison of the 2011 and 2012 #SOTU

I wrote a quick (and very dirty) R script for creating a comparison cloud and a commonality cloud for President Obama’s 2011 and 2012 State of the Union speeches*. The cloud on the left shows words that have different frequencies between … Continue reading

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Why statisticians should join and launch startups

The tough economic times we live in, and the potential for big paydays, have made entrepreneurship cool. From the venture capitalist-in-chief, to the javascript coding mayor of New York, everyone is on board. No surprise there, successful startups lead to job … Continue reading

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Sunday Data/Statistics Link Roundup (1/21)

Is the microarray dead? Jeremey Leipzig seems to think that statistical methods for microarrays should be. I’m not convinced, the technology has finally matured to the point we can use it for personalized medicine and we abandon it for the … Continue reading

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Interview With Joe Blitzstein

Joe Blitzstein Joe Blitzstein is Professor of the Practice in Statistics at Harvard University and co-director of the graduate program. He moved to Harvard after obtaining his Ph.D. with Persi Diaconis at Stanford University. Since joining the faculty at Harvard, … Continue reading

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