Monthly Archives: April 2012

A disappointing response from @NatureMagazine about folks with statistical skills

Last week I linked to an ad for a Data Editor position at Nature Magazine. I was super excited that Nature was recognizing data as an important growth area. But the ad doesn’t mention anything about statistical analysis skills; it focuses … Continue reading

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Sunday data/statistics link roundup (4/29)

Nature genetics has an editorial on the Mayo and Myriad cases. I agree with this bit: “In our opinion, it is not new judgments or legislation that are needed but more innovation. In the era of whole-genome sequencing of highly … Continue reading

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People in positions of power that don't understand statistics are a big problem for genomics

I finally got around to reading the IOM report on translational omics and it is very good. The report lays out problems with current practices and how these led to undesired results such as the now infamous Duke trials and the growth in retractions in … Continue reading

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Nature is hiring a data editor...how will they make sense of the data?

It looks like the journal Nature is hiring a Chief Data Editor (link via Hilary M.). It looks like the primary purpose of this editor is to develop tools for collecting, curating, and distributing data with the goal of improving reproducible … Continue reading

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How do I know if my figure is too complicated?

One of the key things every statistician needs to learn is how to create informative figures and graphs. Sometimes, it is easy to use off-the-shelf plots like barplots, histograms, or if one is truly desperate a pie-chart.  But sometimes the information … Continue reading

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On the future of personalized medicine

Jeff Leek, Reeves Anderson, and I recently wrote a correspondence to Nature (subscription req.) regarding the Supreme Court decision in Mayo v. Prometheus and the recent Institute of Medicine report related to the Duke Clinical Trials Saga.  The basic gist of the … Continue reading

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Sunday data/statistics link roundup (4/22)

Now we know who is to blame for the pie chart. I had no idea it had been around, straining our ability to compare relative areas, since 1801. However, the same guy (William Playfair) apparently also invented the bar chart. … Continue reading

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Replication, psychology, and big science

Reproducibility has been a hot topic for the last several years among computational scientists. A study is reproducible if there is a specific set of computational functions/analyses (usually specified in terms of code) that exactly reproduce all of the numbers in a published paper … Continue reading

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Roche: Illumina Is No Apple

Roche: Illumina Is No Apple

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Sunday data/statistics link roundup (4/15)

Incredibly cook, dynamic real-time maps of wind patterns in the United States. (Via Flowing Data) A d3.js coding tool that updates automatically as you update the code. This is going to be really useful for beginners trying to learn about … Continue reading

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