Monthly Archives: January 2013

Welcome to the Smog-ocalypse

Recent reports of air pollution levels out of Beijing are very very disturbing. Levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5, or PM less than 2.5 microns in diameter) have reached unprecedented levels. So high are the levels that even the official media … Continue reading

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Sunday data/statistics link roundup (1/13/2013)

These are some great talks. But definitely watch Michael Eisen's talk on E-biomed and the history of open access publication. This is particularly poigniant in light of Aaron Swartz's tragic suicide. It's also worth checking out the twitter hashtag #pdftribute . … Continue reading

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NSF should understand that Statistics is not Mathematics

NSF has realized that the role of Statistics is growing in all areas of science and engineering and has formed a subcommittee to examine the current structure of support of the statistical sciences.  As Roger explained in August, the NSF is divided into directorates … Continue reading

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The landscape of data analysis

I have been getting some questions via email, LinkedIn, and Twitter about the content of the Data Analysis class I will be teaching for Coursera. Data Analysis and Data Science mean different things to different people. So I made a … Continue reading

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By introducing competition open online education will improve teaching at top universities

It is no secret that faculty evaluations at top universities weigh research much more than teaching. This is not surprising given that, among other reasons,  global visibility comes from academic innovation (think Nobel Prizes) not classroom instruction. Come promotion time the peer review system … Continue reading

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Sunday data/statistics link roundup (1/6/2013)

Not really statistics, but this is an interesting article about how rational optimization by individual actors does not always lead to an optimal solutiohn. Related, ere is the coolest street sign I think I've ever seen, with a heatmap of … Continue reading

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Does NIH fund innovative work? Does Nature care about publishing accurate articles?

Editor's Note: In a recent post we disagreed with a Nature article claiming that NIH doesn't support innovation. Our colleague Steven Salzberg actually looked at the data and wrote the guest post below.  Nature published an article last month with the provocative title … Continue reading

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The scientific reasons it is not helpful to study the Newtown shooter's DNA

The Connecticut Medical Examiner has asked to sequence and study the DNA of the recent Newtown shooter. I've been seeing this pop up over the last few days on a lot of popular media sites, where they mention some objections … Continue reading

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Fitbit, why can't I have my data?

I have a Fitbit. I got it because I wanted to collect some data about myself and I liked the simplicity of the set-up. I also asked around and Fitbit seemed like the most "open" platform for collecting one's own … Continue reading

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Happy 2013: The International Year of Statistics

The ASA has declared 2013 to be the International Year of Statistics and I am ready to celebrate it in full force. It is a great time to be a statistician and I am hoping more people will join the … Continue reading

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