Monthly Archives: February 2013

Please save the unsolicited R01s

Editor's note: With the sequestration deadline hours away, the career of many young US scientists is on the line.  In this guest post, our colleague Steven Salzberg , an avid defender of NIH and its peer review process, tells us why now more … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 27 Comments

Big data: Giving people what they want

Netflix is using data to create original content for its subscribers, the first example of which was House of Cards. Three main data points for this show were that (1) People like David Fincher (because they watch The Social Network, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (2/24/2013)

An attempt to create a version of knitr for stata (via John M.). I  like the direction that reproducible research is moving - toward easier use and wider spread adoption. The success of iPython notebook is another great sign for the whole … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Tesla vs. NYT: Do the Data Really Tell All?

I've enjoyed so far the back and forth between Tesla Motors and New York Times reporter John Broder. The short version is Broder tested one of Tesla's new Model S all-electric sedans on a drive from Washington, D.C. to Groton, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 8 Comments

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (2/17/2013)

The Why Axis - discussion of important visualizations on the web. This is one I think a lot of people know about, but it is new to me. (via Thomas L. - p.s. I'm @leekgroup on Twitter, not @jtleek).  This paper … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 4 Comments

Interview with Nick Chamandy, statistician at Google

Nick Chamandy Nick Chamandy received his M.S. in statistics from the University of Chicago, his Ph.D. in statistics at McGill University and joined Google as a statistician. We talked to him about how he ended up at Google, what software … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

I'm a young scientist and sequestration will hurt me

I'm a biostatistician. That means that I help scientists and doctors analyze their medical data to try to figure out new screening tools, new therapies, and new ways to improve patients' health. I'm also a professor. I  spend a good … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 15 Comments

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (2/10/2013)

An article about how NBA teams have installed cameras that allow their analysts to collect information on every movement/pass/play that is performed in a game. I think the most interesting part for me would be how you would define features. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Issues with reproducibility at scale on Coursera

As you know, we are big fans of reproducible research here at Simply Statistics. The scandal around the lack of reproducibility in the analyses performed by Anil Potti and subsequent fallout drove the importance of this topic home. So when … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 23 Comments

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (2/3/2013)

My student, Hilary, wrote a post about how her name is the most poisoned in history. A poisoned name is a name that quickly loses popularity year over year. The post is awesome for the following reasons: (1) she is … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 5 Comments