Monthly Archives: July 2013

The researcher degrees of freedom - recipe tradeoff in data analysis

An important concept that is only recently gaining the attention it deserves is researcher degrees of freedom. From Simmons et al.: The culprit is a construct we refer to as researcher degrees of freedom. In the course of collecting and … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (7/28/13)

An article in the Huffpo about a report claiming there is no gender bias in the hiring of physics faculty. I didn't read the paper carefully but  I definitely agree with the quote from  Prof. Dame Athene Donald that the comparison should … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Statistics takes center stage in the Independent

Check out this really good piece over at the Independent. It talks about the rise of statisticians as rockstars, naming Hans Rosling, Nate Silver, and Chris Volinsky among others. I think that those guys are great and deserve all the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

What are the 5 most influential statistics papers of 2000-2010?

A few folks here at Hopkins were just reading the comments of our post on  awesome young/senior statisticians. It was cool to see the diversity of opinions and all the impressive people working in our field. We realized that another … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 21 Comments

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (7/21/2013)

Let's shake up the social sciences is a piece in the New York Times by Nicholas Christakis who rose to fame by claiming that obesity is contagious. Gelman responds that he thinks maybe Christakis got a little ahead of himself. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

The "failure" of MOOCs and the ecological fallacy

At first blush the news out of San Jose State that the partnership with Udacity is being temporarily suspended is bad news for MOOCs. It is particularly bad news since the main reason for the suspension is poor student performance … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 7 Comments

Defending clinical trials

The New York Times has published some letters to the Editor in response to the piece by Clifton Leaf on clinical trials. You can also see our response here.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Name 5 statisticians, now name 5 young statisticians

I have been thinking for a while how hard it is to find statisticians to interview for the blog. When I started the interview series, it was targeted at interviewing statisticians at the early stages of their careers. It is … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 22 Comments

Yes, Clinical Trials Work

This saturday the New York Times published an opinion pieces wondering "do clinical trials work?". The answer, of course, is: absolutely. For those that don't know the history, randomized control trials (RCTs) are one of the reasons why life spans skyrocketed … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 6 Comments

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (7/14/2013)

Question: Do clinical trials work?Answer: Yes. Clinical trials are one of the defining success stories in the process of scientific inquiry. Do they work as fast/efficiently as a pharma company with potentially billions on the line would like? That is definitely … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment