Tag Archives: R

Podcast #5: Coursera Debrief

Jeff and I talk with Brian Caffo about teaching MOOCs on Coursera. Tweet Vote on HN

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On weather forecasts, Nate Silver, and the politicization of statistical illiteracy

As you know, we have a thing for statistical literacy here at Simply Stats. So of course this column over at Politico got our attention (via Chris V. and others). The column is an attack on Nate Silver, who has … Continue reading

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Computing for Data Analysis (Simply Statistics Edition)

As the entire East Coast gets soaked by Hurricane Sandy, I can’t help but think that this is the perfect time to…take a course online! Well, as long as you have electricity, that is. I live in a heavily tree-lined … Continue reading

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A statistical project bleg (urgent-ish)

We all know that politicians can play it a little fast and loose with the truth. This is particularly true in debates, where politicians have to think on their feet and respond to questions from the audience or from each … Continue reading

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Why we are teaching massive open online courses (MOOCs) in R/statistics for Coursera

Editor’s Note: This post written by Roger Peng and Jeff Leek.  A couple of weeks ago, we announced that we would be teaching free courses in Computing for Data Analysis and Data Analysis on the Coursera platform. At the same … Continue reading

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Really Big Objects Coming to R

I noticed in the development version of R the following note in the NEWS file: There is a subtle change in behaviour for numeric index values 2^31 and larger.  These used never to be legitimate and so were treated as NA, sometimes … Continue reading

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A closer look at data suggests Johns Hopkins is still the #1 US hospital

The US News best hospital 2012-20132 rankings are out. The big news is that Johns Hopkins has lost its throne. For 21 consecutive years Hopkins was ranked #1, but this year Mass General Hospital (MGH) took the top spot displacing Hopkins … Continue reading

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Johns Hopkins Coursera Statistics Courses

Computing for Data Analysis [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gk6E57H6mTs] Data Analysis [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lutj1vrPwQ] Mathematical Biostatistics Bootcamp [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekdpaf_WT_8] Tweet Vote on HN

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This graph shows that President Obama's proposed budget treats the NIH even worse than G.W. Bush - Sign the petition to increase NIH funding!

The NIH provides financial support for a large percentage of biological and medical research in the United States. This funding supports a large number of US jobs, creates new knowledge, and improves healthcare for everyone. So I am signing this … Continue reading

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A plot of my citations in Google Scholar vs. Web of Science

There has been some discussion about whether Google Scholar or one of the proprietary software companies numbers are better for citation counts. I personally think Google Scholar is better for a number of reasons: Higher numbers, but consistently/adjustably higher It’s free and the data … Continue reading

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