Tag Archives: Rant

Statistical illiteracy may lead to parents panicking about Autism.

I just was doing my morning reading of a few news sources and stumbled across this Huffington Post article talking about research correlating babies cries to autism. It suggests that the sound of a babies cries may predict their future … Continue reading

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The pebbles of academia

I have just been awarded a certificate for successful completion of the Conflict of Interest Commitment training (I barely passed). Lately, I have been totally swamped by administrative duties and have had little time for actual research. The experience reminded … Continue reading

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Sunday Data/Statistics Link Roundup (7/22/12)

This paper is the paper describing how Uri Simonsohn identified academic misconduct using statistical analyses. This approach has received a huge amount of press in the scientific literature. The basic approach is that he calculates the standard deviations of mean/standard deviation … Continue reading

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My worst (recent) experience with peer review

My colleagues and I just published a paper on validation of genomic results in BMC Bioinformatics. It is “highly accessed” and we are really happy with how it turned out.  But it was brutal getting it published. Here is the … Continue reading

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What is a major revision?

I posted a little while ago on a proposal for a fast statistics journal. It generated a bunch of comments and even a really nice follow up post with some great ideas. Since then I’ve gotten reviews back on a … Continue reading

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Sunday data/statistics link roundup (3/18)

A really interesting proposal by Rafa (in Spanish - we’ll get on him to write a translation) for the University of Puerto Rico. The post concerns changing the focus from simply teaching to creating knowledge and the potential benefits to … Continue reading

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An example of how sending a paper to a statistics journal can get you scooped

In a previous post I complained about statistics journals taking way too long rejecting papers. Today I am complaining because even when everything goes right —better than above average review time (for statistics), useful and insightful comments from reviewers— we can … Continue reading

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Where do you get your data?

Here’s a question I get fairly frequently from various types of people: Where do you get your data? This is sometimes followed up quickly with “Can we use some of your data?” My contention is that if someone asks you … Continue reading

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P-values and hypothesis testing get a bad rap - but we sometimes find them useful.

This post written by Jeff Leek and Rafa Irizarry. The p-value is the most widely-known statistic. P-values are reported in a large majority of scientific publications that measure and report data. R.A. Fisher is widely credited with inventing the p-value. … Continue reading

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Dear editors/associate editors/referees, Please reject my papers quickly

The review times for most journals in our field are ridiculous. Check out Figure 1 here. A careful review takes time, but not six months. Let’s be honest, those papers are sitting on desks for the great majority of those six … Continue reading

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