Tag Archives: reproducibility

Does NIH fund innovative work? Does Nature care about publishing accurate articles?

Editor's Note: In a recent post we disagreed with a Nature article claiming that NIH doesn't support innovation. Our colleague Steven Salzberg actually looked at the data and wrote the guest post below.  Nature published an article last month with the provocative title … Continue reading

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Replication and validation in -omics studies - just as important as reproducibility

The psychology/social psychology community has made replication a huge focus over the last year. One reason is the recent, public blow-up over a famous study that did not replicate. There are also concerns about the experimental and conceptual design of … Continue reading

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People in positions of power that don't understand statistics are a big problem for genomics

I finally got around to reading the IOM report on translational omics and it is very good. The report lays out problems with current practices and how these led to undesired results such as the now infamous Duke trials and the growth in retractions in … Continue reading

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Replication, psychology, and big science

Reproducibility has been a hot topic for the last several years among computational scientists. A study is reproducible if there is a specific set of computational functions/analyses (usually specified in terms of code) that exactly reproduce all of the numbers in a published paper … Continue reading

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Some thoughts from Keith Baggerly on the recently released IOM report on translational omics

Shortly after the Duke trial scandal broke, the Institute of Medicine convened a committee to write a report on translational omics. Several statisticians (including one of our interviewees) either served on the committee or provided key testimony. The report came out yesterday.  Nature, Nature Medicine, and … Continue reading

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Where do you get your data?

Here’s a question I get fairly frequently from various types of people: Where do you get your data? This is sometimes followed up quickly with “Can we use some of your data?” My contention is that if someone asks you … Continue reading

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Preventing Errors through Reproducibility

Checklist mania has hit clinical medicine thanks to people like Peter Pronovost and many others. The basic idea is that simple and short checklists along with changes to clinical culture can prevent major errors from occurring in medical practice. One … Continue reading

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Reproducible Research in Computational Science

First of all, thanks to Rafa for scooping me with my own article. Not sure if that’s reverse scooping or recursive scooping or…. The latest issue of Science has a special section on Data Replication and Reproducibility. As part of the … Continue reading

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Reproducible Research and Turkey

Over the Thanksgiving recent break I naturally started thinking about reproducible research in between salting the turkey and making the turkey stock. Clearly, these things are all related.  I sometimes get the sense that many people see reproducibility as essentially … Continue reading

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Reproducible research: Notes from the field

Over the past year, I’ve been doing a lot of talking about reproducible research. Talking to people, talking on panel discussions, and talking about some of my own work. It seems to me that interest in the topic has exploded … Continue reading

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