Sunday data/statistics link roundup (11/9/14)

So I’m a day late, but you know, I got a new kid and stuff…

  1. The New Yorker hating on MOOCs, they mention all the usual stuff. Including the really poorly designed San Jose State experiment. I think this deserves a longer post, but this is definitely a case where people are looking at MOOCs on the wrong part of the hype curve. MOOCs won’t solve all possible education problems, but they are hugely helpful to many people and writing them off is a little silly (via Rafa).
  2. My colleague Dan S. is teaching a missing data workshop here at Hopkins next week (via Dan S.)
  3. A couple of cool Youtube videos explaining how the normal distribution sounds and the pareto principle with paperclips (via Presh T., pair with the 8020 rule of statistical methods development)
  4. If you aren’t following Research Wahlberg, you aren’t on academic twitter.
  5. I followed  #biodata14  closely. I think having a meeting on Biological Big Data is a great idea and many of the discussion leaders are people I admire a ton. I also am a big fan of Mike S. I have to say I was pretty bummed that more statisticians weren’t invited (we like to party too!).
  6. Our data science specialization generates almost 1,000 new R github repos a month! Roger and I are in a neck and neck race to be the person who has taught the most people statistics/data science in the history of the world.
  7. The Rstudio guys have also put together what looks like a great course similar in spirit to our Data Science Specialization. The Rstudio folks have been *super* supportive of the DSS and we assume anything they make will be awesome.
  8. Congrats to Data Carpentry and [So I’m a day late, but you know, I got a new kid and stuff…

  9. The New Yorker hating on MOOCs, they mention all the usual stuff. Including the really poorly designed San Jose State experiment. I think this deserves a longer post, but this is definitely a case where people are looking at MOOCs on the wrong part of the hype curve. MOOCs won’t solve all possible education problems, but they are hugely helpful to many people and writing them off is a little silly (via Rafa).

  10. My colleague Dan S. is teaching a missing data workshop here at Hopkins next week (via Dan S.)

  11. A couple of cool Youtube videos explaining how the normal distribution sounds and the pareto principle with paperclips (via Presh T., pair with the 8020 rule of statistical methods development)

  12. If you aren’t following Research Wahlberg, you aren’t on academic twitter.

  13. I followed  #biodata14  closely. I think having a meeting on Biological Big Data is a great idea and many of the discussion leaders are people I admire a ton. I also am a big fan of Mike S. I have to say I was pretty bummed that more statisticians weren’t invited (we like to party too!).

  14. Our data science specialization generates almost 1,000 new R github repos a month! Roger and I are in a neck and neck race to be the person who has taught the most people statistics/data science in the history of the world.

  15. The Rstudio guys have also put together what looks like a great course similar in spirit to our Data Science Specialization. The Rstudio folks have been *super* supportive of the DSS and we assume anything they make will be awesome.

  16. Congrats to Data Carpentry and](https://twitter.com/tracykteal) on their funding from the Moore Foundation!

 
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