Data Visualization

Sunday data/statistics link roundup 12/23/12

A cool data visualization for blood glucose levels for diabetic individuals. This kind of interactive visualization can help people see where/when major health issues arise for chronic diseases. This was a class project by Jeff Heer’s Stanford CS448B students Ben Rudolph and Reno Bowen (twitter @RenoBowen). Speaking of interactive visualizations, I also got this link from Patrick M. It looks like a way to build interactive graphics and my understanding is it is compatible with R data frames, worth checking out (plus, Dex is a good name).

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (12/9/12)

Some interesting data/data visualizations about working conditions in the apparel industry. Here is the full report. Whenever I see reports like this, I wish the raw data were more clearly linked. I want to be able to get in, play with the data, and see if I notice something that doesn’t appear in the infographics.  This is an awesome plain-language discussion of how a bunch of methods (CS and Stats) with fancy names relate to each other.

The statisticians at Fox News use classic and novel graphical techniques to lead with data

Depending on where you land in the political spectrum you may either love or despise Fox News. But regardless of your political affiliation, you have to recognize that their statisticians are well-trained in the art of using graphics to persuade folks of a particular viewpoint. I’m not the first to recognize that the graphics department uses some clever tricks to make certain points. But when flipping through the graphs I thought it was interesting to highlight some of the techniques they use to persuade.

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (7/1)

A really nice explanation of the elements of Obamacare. Rafa’s post on the new inHealth initiative Scott is leading got a lot of comments on Reddit. Some of them are funny (Rafa’s spelling got rocked) and if you get past the usual level of internet-commentary politeness, some of them seem to be really relevant - especially the comments about generalizability and the economics of health care.  From Andrew J.

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (5/27)

Amanda Cox on the process they went through to come up with this graphic about the Facebook IPO. So cool to see how R is used in the development process. A favorite quote of mine, “But rather than bringing clarity, it just sort of looked chaotic, even to the seasoned chart freaks of 620 8th Avenue.” One of the more interesting things about posts like this is you get to see how statistics versus a deadline works.

Interview with Hadley Wickham - Developer of ggplot2

Hadley Wickham Hadley Wickham is the Dobelman Family Junior Chair of Statistics at Rice University. Prior to moving to Rice, he completed his Ph.D. in Statistics from Iowa State University. He is the developer of the wildly popular ggplot2 software for data visualization and a contributor to the Ggobi project. He has developed a number of really useful R packages touching everything from data processing, to data modeling, to visualization.