Interview

Rafa interviewed about statistical genomics

He talks about the problems created by the speed of increase in data sizes in molecular biology, the way that genomics is hugely driven by data analysis/statistics, how Bioconductor is an example of bottom up science, Simply Statistics gets a shout out, how new data are going to lead to new modeling/statistical challenges, and gives an ode to boxplots. It’s worth watching the whole thing…

Interview with Tom Louis - New Chief Scientist at the Census Bureau

Tom Louis Tom Louis is a professor of Biostatistics at Johns Hopkins and will be joining the Census Bureau through an interagency personnel agreement as the new associate director for research and methodology and chief scientist. Tom has an impressive history of accomplishment in developing statistical methods for everything from environmental science to genomics. We talked to Tom about his new role at the Census, how it relates to his impressive research career, and how young statisticians can get involved in the statistical work at the Census.

Not just one statistics interview...John McGready is the Jon Stewart of statistics

_Editor’s Note: We usually reserve Friday’s for posting Simply Statistics Interviews. This week, we have a special guest post by John McGready, a colleague of ours who has been doing interviews with many of us in the department and has some cool ideas about connecting students in their first statistics class with cutting edge researchers wrestling with many of the same concepts applied to modern problems. I’ll let him explain…_

Interview with C. Titus Brown - Computational biologist and open access champion

C. Titus Brown  C. Titus Brown is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Michigan State University. He develops computational software for next generation sequencing and the author of the blog, “Living in an Ivory Basement”. We talked to Titus about open access (he publishes his unfunded grants online!), improving the reputation of PLoS One, his research in computational software development, and work-life balance in academics.

Interview with Lauren Talbot - Quantitative analyst for the NYC Financial Crime Task Force

Lauren Talbot Lauren Talbot is a quantitative analyst for the New York City Financial Crime Task Force. Before working for NYC she was an analyst at Acumen LLC and got her degree in economics from Stanford University. She is a key player turning spatial data in NYC into new tools for government management. We talked to Lauren about her work, how she is using open data to do things like predict where fires might occur, and how she got started in the Financial Crime Task Force.

Interview with Amanda Cox - Graphics Editor at the New York Times

Amanda Cox  Amanda Cox received her M.S. in statistics from the University of Washington in 2005. She then moved to the New York Times, where she is a graphics editor. She, and the graphics team at the New York Times, are responsible for many of the cool, informative, and interactive graphics produced by the Times. For example, this, this and this (the last one, Olympic Symphony, is one of my all time favorites).

Interview with Hadley Wickham - Developer of ggplot2

Hadley Wickham Hadley Wickham is the Dobelman Family Junior Chair of Statistics at Rice University. Prior to moving to Rice, he completed his Ph.D. in Statistics from Iowa State University. He is the developer of the wildly popular ggplot2 software for data visualization and a contributor to the Ggobi project. He has developed a number of really useful R packages touching everything from data processing, to data modeling, to visualization.

Interview with Drew Conway - Author of "Machine Learning for Hackers"

Drew Conway Drew Conway is a Ph.D. student in Politics at New York University and the co-ordinator of the New York Open Statistical Programming Meetup. He is the creator of the famous (or infamous) data science Venn diagram, the basis for our R function to determine if your a data scientist. He is also the co-author of Machine Learning for Hackers, a book of case studies that illustrates data science from a hacker’s perspective.

Interview with Amy Heineike - Director of Mathematics at Quid

Amy Heineike <div> <strong><img src="http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m1588osxOV1r08wvg.jpg" /></strong> </div> <div> <strong><br /></strong>Amy Heineike is the Director of Mathematics at <a href="http://quid.com/" target="_blank">Quid</a>, a startup that seeks to understand technology development and dissemination through data analysis. She was the first employee at Quid, where she helped develop their technology early on. She has been recognized as one of the <a href="http://thephenomlist.com/lists/8/people/32" target="_blank">top Big Data Scientists</a>. As a part of our ongoing <a href="http://simplystatistics.

Interview With Joe Blitzstein

Joe Blitzstein Joe Blitzstein is Professor of the Practice in Statistics at Harvard University and co-director of the graduate program. He moved to Harvard after obtaining his Ph.D. with Persi Diaconis at Stanford University. Since joining the faculty at Harvard, he has been immortalized in Youtube prank videos, been awarded a “favorite professor” distinction four times, and performed interesting research on the statistical analysis of social networks.

Interview with Nathan Yau of FlowingData

Nathan Yau Nathan Yau is a graduate student in statistics at UCLA and the author of the extremely popular data visualization blog flowingdata.com. He recently published a book Visualize This-a really nice guide to modern data visualization using R, Illustrator and Javascript - which should be on the bookshelf of any statistician working on data visualization. Do you consider yourself a statistician/data scientist/or something else?

Interview with Héctor Corrada Bravo

Héctor Corrada Bravo Héctor Corrada Bravo is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and the Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at the University of Maryland, College Park. He moved to College Park after finishing his Ph.D. in computer science at the University of Wisconsin and a postdoc in biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He has done outstanding work at the intersection of molecular biology, computer science, and statistics.

Interview with Victoria Stodden

Victoria Stodden Victoria Stodden is an assistant professor of statistics at Columbia University in New York City. She moved to Columbia after getting her Ph.D. at Stanford University. Victoria has made major contributions to the area of reproducible research and has been appointed to the NSF’s Advisory Committee for Infrastructure. She is the recent recipient of an NSF grant for “Policy Design for Reproducibility and Data Sharing in Computational Science”

Interview With Chris Barr

Chris Barr Chris Barr is an assistant professor of biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. He moved to Boston after getting his Ph.D. at UCLA and then doing a postdoc at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Chris has done important work in environmental biostatistics and is also the co-founder of OpenIntro, a very cool open-source (and free!) educational resource for statistics.   Which term applies to you: data scientist/statistician/analyst?

Interview With Daniela Witten

Note: This is the first in a series of posts where we will be interviewing junior, up-and-coming statisticians/data scientists. Our goal is to build visibility for people who are at the early stages of their careers. Daniela Witten Daniela is an assistant professor of Biostatistics at the University of Washington in Seattle. She moved to Seattle after getting her Ph.D. at Stanford. Daniela has been developing exciting new statistical methods for analyzing high dimensional data and is a recipient of the NIH Director’s Early Independence Award.