Open Access

Interview with C. Titus Brown - Computational biologist and open access champion

C. Titus Brown  C. Titus Brown is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Michigan State University. He develops computational software for next generation sequencing and the author of the blog, “Living in an Ivory Basement”. We talked to Titus about open access (he publishes his unfunded grants online!), improving the reputation of PLoS One, his research in computational software development, and work-life balance in academics.

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (4/22)

Now we know who is to blame for the pie chart. I had no idea it had been around, straining our ability to compare relative areas, since 1801. However, the same guy (William Playfair) apparently also invented the bar chart. So he wouldn’t be totally shunned by statisticians. (via Leonid K.) A nice article in the Guardian about the current group of scientists that are boycotting Elsevier. I have to agree with the quote that leads the article, “All professions are conspiracies against the laity.

Sunday Data/Statistics Link Roundup

A few data/statistics related links of interest: Eric Lander Profile The math of lego (should be “The statistics of lego”) Where people are looking for homes. Hans Rosling’s Ted Talk on the Developing world (an oldie but a goodie) Elsevier is trying to make open-access illegal (not strictly statistics related, but a hugely important issue for academics who believe government funded research should be freely accessible), more here. 

Free access publishing is awesome...but expensive. How do we pay for it?

I am a huge fan of open access journals. I think open access is good both for moral reasons (science should be freely available) and for more selfish ones (I want people to be able to read my work). If given the choice, I would publish all of my work in journals that distribute results freely. But it turns out that for most open/free access systems, the publishing charges are paid by the scientists publishing in the journals.