Sports

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (1/27/2013)

Wisconsin is decoupling the education and degree granting components of education. This means if you take a MOOC like mine, Brian’s or Roger’s and there is an equivalent class to pass at Wisconsin, you can take the exam and get credit. This is big. (via Rafa) 1. Wisconsin is decoupling the education and degree granting components of education. This means if you take a MOOC like mine, Brian’s or Roger’s and there is an equivalent class to pass at Wisconsin, you can take the exam and get credit.

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (11/25/2012)

My wife used to teach at Grinnell College, so we were psyched to see that a Grinnell player set the NCAA record for most points in a game. We used to go to the games, which were amazing to watch, when we lived in Iowa. The system the coach has in place there is a ton of fun to watch and is based on statistics! Someone has to vet the science writers at the Huffpo.

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (8/26/12)

First off, a quick apology for missing last week, and thanks to Augusto for noticing! On to the links: Unbelievably the BRCA gene patents were upheld by the lower court despite the Supreme Court coming down pretty unequivocally against patenting correlations between metabolites and health outcomes. I wonder if this one will be overturned if it makes it back up to the Supreme Court.  A really nice interview with David Spiegelhalter on Statistics and Risk.

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (6/24)

We’ve got a new domain! You can still follow us on tumblr or here: http://simplystatistics.org/.  A cool article on MIT’s annual sports statistics conference (via @storeylab). I love how the guy they chose to highlight created what I would consider a pretty simple visualization with known tools - but it turns out it is potentially a really new way of evaluating the shooting range of basketball players. This is my favorite kind of creativity in statistics.

Archetypal Athletes

Here is a cool paper on the ArXiv about archetypal athletes. The basic idea is to look at a large number of variables for each player and identify multivariate outliers or extremes. These outliers are the archetypes talked about in the title. According to his analysis the author claims the best players (for different reasons, i.e. different archetypes) in the NBA in 2009⁄2010 were: Taj Gibson, Anthony Morrow, and Kevin Durant.