Simply Statistics

A statistics blog by Rafa Irizarry, Roger Peng, and Jeff Leek

The data deluge means no reasonable expectation of privacy - now what?

Today a couple of different things reminded me about something that I suppose many people are talking about but has been on my mind as well. The idea is that many of our societies social norms are based on the reasonable expectation of privacy. But the reasonable expectation of privacy is increasingly a thing of the past. Three types of data I’ve been thinking about are: Obviously identifying data: Data like cellphone GPS traces and public social media posts are obviously information that is indentifiable and reduce privacy.

More datasets for teaching data science: The expanded dslabs package

Introduction We have expanded the dslabs package, which we previously introduced as a package containing realistic, interesting and approachable datasets that can be used in introductory data science courses. This release adds 7 new datasets on climate change, astronomy, life expectancy, and breast cancer diagnosis. They are used in improved problem sets and new projects within the HarvardX Data Science Professional Certificate Program, which teaches beginning R programming, data visualization, data wrangling, statistics, and machine learning for students with no prior coding background.

Research quality data and research quality databases

When you are doing data science, you are doing research. You want to use data to answer a question, identify a new pattern, improve a current product, or come up with a new product. The common factor underlying each of these tasks is that you want to use the data to answer a question that you haven’t answered before. The most effective process we have come up for getting those answers is the scientific research process.

I co-founded a company! Meet Problem Forward Data Science

I have some exciting news about something I’ve been working on for the last year or so. I started a company! It’s called Problem Forward data science. I’m pumped about this new startup for a lot of reasons. My co-founder is one of my families closest friends, Jamie McGovern, who has more than 2 decades of experience in the consulting world and who I’ve known for 15 years. We are creating a cool new model of “data scientist as a service” (more on that below) We have a problem forward, not solution backward approach to data science that grew out of the Hopkins philosophy of data science.

Generative and Analytical Models for Data Analysis

Describing how a data analysis is created is a topic of keen interest to me and there are a few different ways to think about it. Two different ways of thinking about data analysis are what I call the “generative” approach and the “analytical” approach. Another, more informal, way that I like to think about these approaches is as the “biological” model and the “physician” model. Reading through the literature on the process of data analysis, I’ve noticed that many seem to focus on the former rather than the latter and I think that presents an opportunity for new and interesting work.

Tukey, Design Thinking, and Better Questions

Roughly once a year, I read John Tukey’s paper “The Future of Data Analysis”, originally published in 1962 in the Annals of Mathematical Statistics. I’ve been doing this for the past 17 years, each time hoping to really understand what it was he was talking about. Thankfully, each time I read it I seem to get something new out of it. For example, in 2017 I wrote a whole talk around some of the basic ideas.

Interview with Abhi Datta

Editor’s note: This is the next in our series of interviews with early career statisticians and data scientists. Today we are talking to Abhi Datta about his work in large scale spatial analysis and his interest in soccer! Follow him on Twitter at @datta_science. If you have recommendations of an (early career) person in academics or industry you would like to see promoted, reach out to Jeff (@jtleek) on Twitter!

10 things R can do that might surprise you

Over the last few weeks I’ve had a couple of interactions with folks from the computer science world who were pretty disparaging of the R programming language. A lot of the critism focused on perceived limitations of R to statistical analysis. It’s true, R does have a hugely comprehensive list of analysis packages on CRAN, Bioconductor, Neuroconductor, and ROpenSci as well as great package management. As I was having these conversations I realized that R has grown into a multi-purpose connective language for things beyond just data analysis.

Open letter to journal editors: dynamite plots must die

Statisticians have been pointing out the problem with dynamite plots, also known as bar and line graphs, for years. Karl Broman lists them as one of the top ten worst graphs. The problem has even been documented in the peer reviewed literature. For example, this British Journal of Pharmacology paper titled Show the data, don’t conceal them was published in 2011. However, despite all these efforts, dynamite plots continue to be ubiquitous in the scientific literature.

Interview with Stephanie Hicks

Editor’s note: For a while we ran an interview series for statisticians and data scientists, but things have gotten a little hectic around here so we’ve dropped the ball! But we are re-introducing the series, starting with Stephanie Hicks. If you have recommendations of a (junior) person in academics or industry you would like to see promoted, reach out to Jeff (@jtleek) on Twitter! Stephanie Hicks received her PhD in statistics in 2013 at Rice University and has already made major contributions to the analysis of single cell sequencing data and the theory and practice of teaching data science.